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Scuba Diving in Albania

Diving
4 Guests

About This Diving Experience

We are a diving a company established in 2014 which offers all types of scuba diving and fishing. The instructors that work with us are the best in Albania with more than 15 years experience (more than 3000 divings).

We offer everyone the opportunity to experience the underwater world with us

Scuba Diving for Beginners:

1) Divers learn how the diving gear work
2) Shore Diving (before the real diving starts)
3) The mos important scuba diving signs
4) How to equalize the pressure
5) How to clean the mask while diving

- Certified Divers (Experienced)
- Certification cards are checked.

Maximum group of five people, approximately 40 minutes underwater (one tank with 200-210bar).

Details

  • Type: Diving
  • Capacity: 4 People
  • Rental Minimum: 1 hour
  • Cancellation: Full Refund 5 Days Prior

Specs

  • Life jackets/required safety gear
  • Diving regulator
  • Buoyancy compensator
  • Diving cylinder
  • Tank
  • Helmet/mask
  • Diving suit
  • Depth gauge
  • Diving mask
  • Flippers

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Reviews

Scuba Diving in Albania
5 5 4
5.00 5

I contacted Diving Saranda via the very cool GetMyBoat booking App. (I didn’t know they were Diving Saranda whom I also contacted via their Facebook site but they didn’t respond to that for a week. They apparently don’t check Facebook daily, but do respond in real time via the GetMyBoat App that links to their smart phone. They are also setting up a web site which should ease communication further.) I got an IMMEDIATE response from Xhuljano (Julian) and was invited to pick the time they picked us up and the type of dives (wreck, cave, nature, etc.) Cost was Euro 90 a dive with all equipment or Euro 70 if you did more than one dive. You pay upfront for the first dive via the App and cash for the second dive. This was the 152nd country I have dived in and I have never seen such good communication by a dive operator or an easier way to book dives. Diving Saranda really needs to be commended for being so forward thinking in using technology so well. They contacted us the day before our scheduled dives to confirm we were still interested in diving and asked for our sizes for equipment. The next morning, a father and son team showed up on time in a BMW filled with scuba tanks and equipment—effectively a mobile dive shop! Xhuljano, the charming son with good English but just five dives under his belt and his father who learned to dive in Greece commercially with loads of diving experience but no English. We drove less than a minute from our hotel and the car stopped at the beach in front of the five star Hotel Butrinti. We were puzzled and couldn’t believe we were going to dive right in the middle of Saranda Bay! But we were assured no boats were allowed where we were going diving. Big 15 L steel tanks were carried down to the beach and beach goers looked on in amazement as we squeezed into our rented equipment. My spouse is a male 2 XX and struggled to get into the male large suit and the belt was too short so some jury-rigging of weights was required. My equipment was of a good standard except the boots were a bit small (my spouse has the same boot size and they only had one pair in our size). Xhuljano and his father (whose name we never got as he is a man of very few words and a bit dour) were supremely helpful in getting us into the water. My spouse had had a knee replacement three months ago and so needed help putting the tank on in the water. Our first dive was MS Probitas, a WW 2 Italian cargo ship sunk by the Germans on 24th September 1943. We had to swim out 300 meters from the beach to a buoy marking the wreck. It is 115 meters long and in excellent condition. Visibilty was 10-15 meters and she lies on her port side at less than 20 meters. You can see an intact steering wheel; the engine room; hull structures well preserved but also showing damage from the bomb blast. We saw an octopus on the mast, which our dive master grabbed to show us and which promptly squirted masses of black ink. The DM stayed with us the whole dive and was quick to help with cramps and adjusting equipment. We always felt safe and that he was in control of the dive. Dive temperature was 21-24C with some noticeable thermoclines. Dive time 44 minutes. We were going to do a cave dive for the second dive but the wind picked up strongly and made entry too difficult. So Jhulian’s father made the right call to take us for a “nature dive”. We drove about 20 minutes from Saranda to Gjiri Beach where the “Italian makeshift Kitchen” sets up to feed beach goers. After an hour’s surface interval, we were again helped on with our equipment. This was much more difficult given the rocky entry and strong waves. My spouse became very afraid for her knees. But Jhulian and his father calmed her and got the gear on her safely—getting out proved to be very tricky. Most of the beach goers got out as the waves were over one meter high, but again the father and son team were superb at helping out. The dive proved very interesting with varied topography: sand; pebbles; sea weed; algae; rocks that locked like sheet metal; porous limestone formations. The Ionian Sea, like the Med., is fished out, but the DM spotted a seahorse a short distance from the beach at the beginning of our dive and a small flounder. He also pointed out a WW 2 bomb. Water temperature was 24-26 C; max depth 13.3 meters. Dive time 46 minutes. The whole Albanian dive experience from booking so easily to being delivered back to our hotel was great. We had some of the most interesting dives we have had anywhere and Xhuljano and his Dad looked after us well. New comers to diving might be nervous diving with someone who doesn’t speak their language and you get little by way of a dive briefing as Xhuljano’s father comes from a commercial rather than recreational diving background. So such diving is more suitable for divers with some experience. Divers taught to respect marine life might also be put off when the DM grabs octopuses, but this is also standard practice in Greece designed to show you more. If you tell them not to do this at the beginning of your dive, I’m sure they will aim to please. We are more than happy to recommend Dive Saranda!

July 2017
5.00 5

I contacted Diving Saranda via the very cool GetMyBoat booking App. (I didn’t know they were Diving Saranda whom I also contacted via their Facebook site but they didn’t respond to that for a week. They apparently don’t check Facebook daily, but do respond in real time via the GetMyBoat App that links to their smart phone. They are also setting up a web site which should ease communication further.) I got an IMMEDIATE response from Xhuljano (Julian) and was invited to pick the time they picked us up and the type of dives (wreck, cave, nature, etc.) Cost was Euro 90 a dive with all equipment or Euro 70 if you did more than one dive. You pay upfront for the first dive via the App and cash for the second dive. This was the 152nd country I have dived in and I have never seen such good communication by a dive operator or an easier way to book dives. Diving Saranda really needs to be commended for being so forward thinking in using technology so well. They contacted us the day before our scheduled dives to confirm we were still interested in diving and asked for our sizes for equipment. The next morning, a father and son team showed up on time in a BMW filled with scuba tanks and equipment—effectively a mobile dive shop! Xhuljano, the charming son with good English but just five dives under his belt and his father who learned to dive in Greece commercially with loads of diving experience but no English. We drove less than a minute from our hotel and the car stopped at the beach in front of the five star Hotel Butrinti. We were puzzled and couldn’t believe we were going to dive right in the middle of Saranda Bay! But we were assured no boats were allowed where we were going diving. Big 15 L steel tanks were carried down to the beach and beach goers looked on in amazement as we squeezed into our rented equipment. My spouse is a male 2 XX and struggled to get into the male large suit and the belt was too short so some jury-rigging of weights was required. My equipment was of a good standard except the boots were a bit small (my spouse has the same boot size and they only had one pair in our size). Xhuljano and his father (whose name we never got as he is a man of very few words and a bit dour) were supremely helpful in getting us into the water. My spouse had had a knee replacement three months ago and so needed help putting the tank on in the water. Our first dive was MS Probitas, a WW 2 Italian cargo ship sunk by the Germans on 24th September 1943. We had to swim out 300 meters from the beach to a buoy marking the wreck. It is 115 meters long and in excellent condition. Visibilty was 10-15 meters and she lies on her port side at less than 20 meters. You can see an intact steering wheel; the engine room; hull structures well preserved but also showing damage from the bomb blast. We saw an octopus on the mast, which our dive master grabbed to show us and which promptly squirted masses of black ink. The DM stayed with us the whole dive and was quick to help with cramps and adjusting equipment. We always felt safe and that he was in control of the dive. Dive temperature was 21-24C with some noticeable thermoclines. Dive time 44 minutes. We were going to do a cave dive for the second dive but the wind picked up strongly and made entry too difficult. So Jhulian’s father made the right call to take us for a “nature dive”. We drove about 20 minutes from Saranda to Gjiri Beach where the “Italian makeshift Kitchen” sets up to feed beach goers. After an hour’s surface interval, we were again helped on with our equipment. This was much more difficult given the rocky entry and strong waves. My spouse became very afraid for her knees. But Jhulian and his father calmed her and got the gear on her safely—getting out proved to be very tricky. Most of the beach goers got out as the waves were over one meter high, but again the father and son team were superb at helping out. The dive proved very interesting with varied topography: sand; pebbles; sea weed; algae; rocks that locked like sheet metal; porous limestone formations. The Ionian Sea, like the Med., is fished out, but the DM spotted a seahorse a short distance from the beach at the beginning of our dive and a small flounder. He also pointed out a WW 2 bomb. Water temperature was 24-26 C; max depth 13.3 meters. Dive time 46 minutes. The whole Albanian dive experience from booking so easily to being delivered back to our hotel was great. We had some of the most interesting dives we have had anywhere and Xhuljano and his Dad looked after us well. New comers to diving might be nervous diving with someone who doesn’t speak their language and you get little by way of a dive briefing as Xhuljano’s father comes from a commercial rather than recreational diving background. So such diving is more suitable for divers with some experience. Divers taught to respect marine life might also be put off when the DM grabs octopuses, but this is also standard practice in Greece designed to show you more. If you tell them not to do this at the beginning of your dive, I’m sure they will aim to please. We are more than happy to recommend Dive Saranda!

July 2017
5.00 5

I wasn’t expecting much of the dives in Albania based on the one review posted by a French diver saying there was nothing to see. But our dives in Corfu had been good and it is just a hop, skip and jump away from Saranda, so how bad could it be. I contacted the Polish (there are LOTS of Poles in Saranda after a cheap beach holiday) Dive Base but they didn’t respond the same day and I had seen some reports on the Internet that they had closed down. They did respond a day later and confirmed that they were open, so that might be another option to dive with. I contacted Diving Saranda via the very cool GetMyBoat booking App. (I didn’t know they were Diving Saranda whom I also contacted via their Facebook site but they didn’t respond to that for a week. They apparently don’t check Facebook daily, but do respond in real time via the GetMyBoat App that links to their smart phone. They are also setting up a web site which should ease communication further.) I got an IMMEDIATE response from Xhuljano (Julian) and was invited to pick the time they picked us up and the type of dives (wreck, cave, nature, etc.) Cost was Euro 90 a dive with all equipment or Euro 70 if you did more than one dive. You pay upfront for the first dive via the App and cash for the second dive. This was the 152nd country I have dived in and I have never seen such good communication by a dive operator or an easier way to book dives. Diving Saranda really needs to be commended for being so forward thinking in using technology so well. They contacted us the day before our scheduled dives to confirm we were still interested in diving and asked for our sizes for equipment. The next morning, a father and son team showed up on time in a BMW filled with scuba tanks and equipment—effectively a mobile dive shop! Xhuljano, the charming son with good English but just five dives under his belt and his father who learned to dive in Greece commercially with loads of diving experience but no English. We drove less than a minute from our hotel and the car stopped at the beach in front of the five star Hotel Butrinti. We were puzzled and couldn’t believe we were going to dive right in the middle of Saranda Bay! But we were assured no boats were allowed where we were going diving. Big 15 L steel tanks were carried down to the beach and beach goers looked on in amazement as we squeezed into our rented equipment. My spouse is a male 2 XX and struggled to get into the male large suit and the belt was too short so some jury-rigging of weights was required. My equipment was of a good standard except the boots were a bit small (my spouse has the same boot size and they only had one pair in our size). Xhuljano and his father (whose name we never got as he is a man of very few words and a bit dour) were supremely helpful in getting us into the water. My spouse had had a knee replacement three months ago and so needed help putting the tank on in the water. Our first dive was MS Probitas, a WW 2 Italian cargo ship sunk by the Germans on 24th September 1943. We had to swim out 300 meters from the beach to a buoy marking the wreck. It is 115 meters long and in excellent condition. Visibilty was 10-15 meters and she lies on her port side at less than 20 meters. You can see an intact steering wheel; the engine room; hull structures well preserved but also showing damage from the bomb blast. We saw an octopus on the mast, which our dive master grabbed to show us and which promptly squirted masses of black ink. The DM stayed with us the whole dive and was quick to help with cramps and adjusting equipment. We always felt safe and that he was in control of the dive. Dive temperature was 21-24C with some noticeable thermoclines. Dive time 44 minutes. We were going to do a cave dive for the second dive but the wind picked up strongly and made entry too difficult. So Jhulian’s father made the right call to take us for a “nature dive”. We drove about 20 minutes from Saranda to Gjiri Beach where the “Italian makeshift Kitchen” sets up to feed beach goers. After an hour’s surface interval, we were again helped on with our equipment. This was much more difficult given the rocky entry and strong waves. My spouse became very afraid for her knees. But Jhulian and his father calmed her and got the gear on her safely—getting out proved to be very tricky. Most of the beach goers got out as the waves were over one meter high, but again the father and son team were superb at helping out. The dive proved very interesting with varied topography: sand; pebbles; sea weed; algae; rocks that locked like sheet metal; porous limestone formations. The Ionian Sea, like the Med., is fished out, but the DM spotted a seahorse a short distance from the beach at the beginning of our dive and a small flounder. He also pointed out a WW 2 bomb. Water temperature was 24-26 C; max depth 13.3 meters. Dive time 46 minutes. The whole Albanian dive experience from booking so easily to being delivered back to our hotel was great. We had some of the most interesting dives we have had anywhere and Xhuljano and his Dad looked after us well. New comers to diving might be nervous diving with someone who doesn’t speak their language and you get little by way of a dive briefing as Xhuljano’s father comes from a commercial rather than recreational diving background. So such diving is more suitable for divers with some experience. Divers taught to respect marine life might also be put off when the DM grabs octopuses, but this is also standard practice in Greece designed to show you more. If you tell them not to do this at the beginning of your dive, I’m sure they will aim to please. We are more than happy to recommend Dive Saranda!

July 2017
5.00 5

Saranda 27 July 2017 I wasn’t expecting much of the dives in Albania based on the one review posted by a French diver saying there was nothing to see. But our dives in Corfu had been good and it is just a hop, skip and jump away from Saranda, so how bad could it be. I contacted Diving Saranda via the very cool GetMyBoat booking App. (I didn’t know they were Diving Saranda whom I also contacted via their Facebook site but they didn’t respond to that for a week. They apparently don’t check Facebook daily, but do respond in real time via the GetMyBoat App that links to their smart phone. They are also setting up a web site which should ease communication further.) I got an IMMEDIATE response from Xhuljano (Julian) and was invited to pick the time they picked us up and the type of dives (wreck, cave, nature, etc.) Cost was Euro 90 a dive with all equipment or Euro 70 if you did more than one dive. You pay upfront for the first dive via the App and cash for the second dive. This was the 152nd country I have dived in and I have never seen such good communication by a dive operator or an easier way to book dives. Diving Saranda really needs to be commended for being so forward thinking in using technology so well. They contacted us the day before our scheduled dives to confirm we were still interested in diving and asked for our sizes for equipment. The next morning, a father and son team showed up on time in a BMW filled with scuba tanks and equipment—effectively a mobile dive shop! Xhuljano, the charming son with good English but just five dives under his belt and his father who learned to dive in Greece commercially with loads of diving experience but no English. We drove less than a minute from our hotel and the car stopped at the beach in front of the five star Hotel Butrinti. We were puzzled and couldn’t believe we were going to dive right in the middle of Saranda Bay! But we were assured no boats were allowed where we were going diving. Big 15 L steel tanks were carried down to the beach and beach goers looked on in amazement as we squeezed into our rented equipment. My spouse is a male 2 XX and struggled to get into the male large suit and the belt was too short so some jury-rigging of weights was required. My equipment was of a good standard except the boots were a bit small (my spouse has the same boot size and they only had one pair in our size). Xhuljano and his father (whose name we never got as he is a man of very few words and a bit dour) were supremely helpful in getting us into the water. My spouse had had a knee replacement three months ago and so needed help putting the tank on in the water. Our first dive was MS Probitas, a WW 2 Italian cargo ship sunk by the Germans on 24th September 1943. We had to swim out 300 meters from the beach to a buoy marking the wreck. It is 115 meters long and in excellent condition. Visibilty was 10-15 meters and she lies on her port side at less than 20 meters. You can see an intact steering wheel; the engine room; hull structures well preserved but also showing damage from the bomb blast. We saw an octopus on the mast, which our dive master grabbed to show us and which promptly squirted masses of black ink. The DM stayed with us the whole dive and was quick to help with cramps and adjusting equipment. We always felt safe and that he was in control of the dive. Dive temperature was 21-24C with some noticeable thermoclines. Dive time 44 minutes. We were going to do a cave dive for the second dive but the wind picked up strongly and made entry too difficult. So Jhulian’s father made the right call to take us for a “nature dive”. We drove about 20 minutes from Saranda to Gjiri Beach where the “Italian makeshift Kitchen” sets up to feed beach goers. After an hour’s surface interval, we were again helped on with our equipment. This was much more difficult given the rocky entry and strong waves. My spouse became very afraid for her knees. But Jhulian and his father calmed her and got the gear on her safely—getting out proved to be very tricky. Most of the beach goers got out as the waves were over one meter high, but again the father and son team were superb at helping out. The dive proved very interesting with varied topography: sand; pebbles; sea weed; algae; rocks that locked like sheet metal; porous limestone formations. The Ionian Sea, like the Med., is fished out, but the DM spotted a seahorse a short distance from the beach at the beginning of our dive and a small flounder. He also pointed out a WW 2 bomb. Water temperature was 24-26 C; max depth 13.3 meters. Dive time 46 minutes. The whole Albanian dive experience from booking so easily to being delivered back to our hotel was great. We had some of the most interesting dives we have had anywhere and Xhuljano and his Dad looked after us well. New comers to diving might be nervous diving with someone who doesn’t speak their language and you get little by way of a dive briefing as Xhuljano’s father comes from a commercial rather than recreational diving background. So such diving is more suitable for divers with some experience. Divers taught to respect marine life might also be put off when the DM grabs octopuses, but this is also standard practice in Greece designed to show you more. If you tell them not to do this at the beginning of your dive, I’m sure they will aim to please. We are more than happy to recommend Dive Saranda!

July 2017

Meet Xhuljano

Xhuljano

From sarande

Member Since Apr 2017

Contact Owner
Verified
Email Address
  • Listing Address
  • 74 Rruga Onhezmi
  • Sarandë, Qarku i Vlorës
  • Albania

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